Calais Elementary School

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Principal's Report

Principal's Report August 2014

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Principal and Superintendent’s Report – August 25, 2014

Link to the current Continuous Improvement Plan: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1h9mfTofFfdiiUqc6OkdIMZ-GArTWzqpSkTXc3Xinl3o/edit?usp=sharing

  1. Literacy

As noted in June, three teachers attended workshops to learn new strategies for teaching literacy. We are looking forward to learning from their experiences in the coming school year.

The CES writing committee met during June in-service and the Continuous Improvement Plan has been updated to reflect their work. The committee will meet again for a three hour meeting on Friday, August 22nd. They will focus on creating final products like prompts and rubrics. We are excited to dig in and get finished materials distributed at the very start of the year! There will be time immediately following committee meetings that day for staff members to share their work with colleagues.

The CIP indicators for June 30, 2014 and September 1, 2014 are pasted below. More details about the work done in June can be found on pages 8 and 9 of the CIP.

Indicator

Did We Make It?

By June 30, 2014

A.       Assessment   results passed on to next grade teacher in all relevant cases

B.       Documented scope and sequence for basic computer skills and   typing in grades 2-6 for the 2014-2015 school year (to ensure we have a plan   for minimum SBAC readiness)

C.       Administer   and analyze results of tool to measure joy and confidence in reading and   writing

D.    Summer reading program in place

A.    Yes. Transition meetings held during   in-service.

B.    No. New deadline is 9/15.

C.       Yes.   Sort of at least; climate survey administered. Results show that students are   more confident in reading than in writing.

D.      Yes.   School-wide goal of reading 103,645 minutes. Option to log online or on paper - clearly shared in   person at Literacy Night and via papers sent home.

By September 1, 2014

A.       All   School Writing Prompt purpose statement written and adopted by staff

B.       Students   assigned to reading booster groups with the reading specialist based on   May/June F&P scores and teacher observations

C.       Plan   for creation of the following documented:

1.        All   nine K-6 writing prompts and finalized rubrics

2.        Coherent,   comprehensive K-6 computer skills and typing scope and sequence

3.        Coherent,   comprehensive K-6 writing conventions scope and sequence

  1. Mathematics

As noted in June, three teachers attended the math lab school with Mahesh Sharma this summer. As we forge ahead with school-based and SU-wide math work, students and teachers will benefit greatly from having engaged in this common professional development experience.

Also over the summer, the WCSU Math Steering Committee met to review several options for an SU-wide math assessment. The committee came to a clear preference and are excited that an SU-wide assessment should be in use in the coming months. The CIP has been updated to reflect the WCSU Math Steering Committee’s leadership of this project.

Like the writing committee, the CES math committee met in June and will do so again on August 22nd. They too will focus on creating ready-to-use products to share with colleagues later in the day.

The CIP indicators for June 30, 2014 and September 30, 2014 are pasted below.

Indicator

Did We Make It?

By June 30, 2014

  1.   Finish K-6 fact fluency/number sense trackers
  2.   Administer   and analyze results of tool to measure joy and confidence in math
  3.   No. Kate and Marissa to make new timetable on 8/8/14
  4.   Yes.   Partially at least; climate survey administered. Results show that math   confidence falls between that for reading (highest) and writing (lowest).

By September 30, 2014

  1.   Fact   fluency/number sense trackers in use
  2.   First   version of intervention forms and procedure created
  3.   Math   practice assessment tool and schedule created
  1. School Climate

Like their colleagues on the math and writing committees, PBIS Leadership Team members met in June to plan for the coming year and will spend three hours on August 22nd creating the documents and other tools needed to hit the ground running with both our Tier 1 and Tier 2 programming.

The CIP indicators for June 30, 2014 and September 1, 2014 are pasted below.

Indicator

Did We Make It?

By June 30, 2014

  1.   May   & June SWIS (behavior) data distributed and analyzed
  2.   Staff   feedback on PBIS (Tiers 1&2) and suggestions for next year solicited and   analyzed
  3.   Tentative   plan in place for each student receiving Tier 2 supports for August 2014
  4. Updated crisis plan complete and distributed
  5.   1-2   parent info night for current K and 1st grade parents hosted in late   May/early June
  6.   Yes.   Results not terribly informative given late start to tracking minor problem   behaviors.
  7.   Partially.   Many surveys administered throughout year - feelings are generally positive   with some sticking points around recognition system and celebrations.
  8.   Yes.
  9. No. Deadline pushed back to start of 14-15   school year. New plans to be distributed and discussed during August   in-service.
  10.   Yes.   Held on 6/4/14

By September 1, 2014

A.       Climate   survey administered and results analyzed

B.       PBIS   refresher/updates meeting held during August in-service

C.       Tier   2 supports up and running for students determined to be in need in June 2014

D.    Revised discipline section of family and staff   handbooks that clearly explains both tiers of PBIS

E.       1-2   teachers have schedule and system for co-planning and other collaboration in   place

Marissa has begun analyzing data from the climate survey administered in May 2014, asking the question, “How do current results compare to those from the fall of 2011?” Thus far, it appears that students, staff members, and families have generally positive feelings about school. The data also shows that families and staff members are feeling significantly better about many areas in which they had significant concerns in the fall of 2011. The analysis below can also be found via a link in the CIP.

Student Surveys

Quantitative analysis comparing previous years’ data to the 2014 results is made difficult by the change in scale and in questions on the most recent edition. Accordingly, exact wording of questions and results are reported to allow for more qualitative discussion.

The mean responses to the five highest scoring questions of the 2011 student survey are reported in the left column (2009 responses are in parentheses). The 2014 question most similar to each 2011 question and its results are reported in the center and right columns.

2011 (Grades 2-6, 74 total)

1 = strongly disagree

5 = strongly agree

2014 (Grades 3-6, 58 total)

1 = not at all

2 = some of the time

3 = most of the time

4 = all of the time

2014 (Grades 1-2, 29 total)

1 = yes

2 = no

3 = I don’t know

1. “My teacher treats me with respect.” 4.38   (4.37)

“My   teacher treats me with respect.” 3.74

1 = 0%, 2 = 2%, 3 = 23%, 4 = 75%

“My   teacher treats me with respect.”

1 = 100%

2. “My teacher is a good teacher.” 4.62 (4.36)

“I get the help I need   at school to be successful.” 3.24

1 = 0%, 2 = 7%, 3 = 44%, 4 = 49%

“I get the help I need   at school to be successful.”

1 = 79%, 2 = 7%, 3 = 14%

3. “I am a good student.” 4.41 (4.45)

“I am a good student   in:”

1. Reading = 86%

2. Writing = 76%

3. Math = 74%

4. Science = 66%

5. Social Studies =   64%

6. Art = 84%

7. Music = 69%

8. Spanish = 43%

9. Gym = 79%

10. Library = 66%

“I am a good student   in:”

1. Reading = 100%

2. Writing = 86%

3. Math = 83%

4. Science = 72%

5. Social Studies =   48%

6. Art = 97%

7. Music = 93%

8. Spanish = 59%

9. Gym = 97%

10. Library = 90%

4. “I read well.” 4.37 (4.34)

See above

See above

5. “My family believes I can do well in school.   4.54 (4.64)

“My parents think that   school is important.” 3.88

1 = 0%, 2 = 0%, 3 = 12%, 4 = 88%

“My parents think that   school is important.”

1 = 90%, 2 = 0%, 3 = 10%

The mean responses to the four lowest scoring questions of the 2011 student survey are reported in the left column (2009 responses are in parentheses). The 2014 question most similar to each 2011 question and its results are reported in the center and right columns.

2011 (Grades 2-6, 74 total)

1 = strongly disagree

5 = strongly agree

2014 (Grades 3-6, 58 total)

1 = not at all

2 = some of the time

3 = most of the time

4 = all of the time

2014 (Grades 1-2, 29 total)

1 = yes

2 = no

3 = I don’t know

“When I am at school, I feel I have fun   learning.” 3.46 (3.77)

“When   I am at school, I have fun learning.” 2.64

1 = 7%, 2 = 36%, 3 = 43%, 4 = 14%

“When   I am at school, I have fun learning.”

1 =   61%, 2 = 25%, 3 = 14%

“I have freedom at this school.” 3.35

No similar question.

No similar question.

“I feel I have choices in what I learn.” 2.79   (3.26)

“When I am at school,   I have choices in what I learn.” 2.36

1 = 5%, 2 = 60%, 3 = 28%, 4 = 7%

“When I am at school,   I have choices in what I learn.”

1 = 72%, 2 = 14%, 3 = 14%

“I am challenged by the work my teacher asks me   to do.” 3.27 (3.41)

“I am challenged by   the work my teacher asks me to do.” 2.56

1 = 4%, 2 = 44%, 3 = 46%, 4 = 7%

“I am challenged by   the work my teacher asks me to do.”

1 = 59%, 2 = 21%, 3 = 21%

 

Family Surveys

The mean responses to the three highest scoring questions of the 2011 parent survey are reported in the left column (2009 responses are in parentheses). The 2014 question most similar to each 2011 question and its results are reported in the right column.

2011 (49 total)

1 = strongly disagree

5 = strongly agree

2014 (47 total)

1 = strongly disagree

5 = strongly agree

“I feel welcome at my child’s school.” 4.43   (4.41)

“I feel welcome at my child's   school.”4.54

1 = 0%, 2 = 0%, 3 = 2%, 4 = 41%, 5 = 57%

“I support my child’s learning at home.” 4.59   (4.51)

“I support my child's   learning at home.” 4.74

1 = 0%, 2 = 0%, 3 = 0%, 4 = 26%, 5 = 74%

“I feel good about myself as a parent.” 4.53   (4.35)

“I feel good about   myself as a parent.” 4.57

1 = 0%, 2 = 0%, 3 = 0%, 4 = 43%, 5 = 57%

The mean responses to the five lowest scoring questions of the 2011 parent survey are reported in the left column (2009 responses are in parentheses). The 2014 question most similar to each 2011 question and its results are reported in the right column. It is worth noting that mean scores went up in all five areas in 2014; an improvement in the mean score of 0.5 or more is indicated by a green cell.

2011 (49 total)

1 = strongly disagree

5 = strongly agree

2014 (47 total)

1 = strongly disagree

5 = strongly agree

“There is adequate supervision during school.”   3.9 (3.81)

“There is adequate   supervision during school.” 4.55

1 = 0%, 2 = 0%, 3 = 6%, 4 = 32%, 5 = 62%

“Students show respect for other students.”   3.78 (3.65)

“Students show respect   for other students.” 4.22

1 = 0%, 2 = 2%, 3 = 11%, 4 = 50%, 5 = 37%

"The school meets the social needs of the   students.” 3.78 (3.78)

“The school meets the   social needs of the students.” 4.30

1 = 0%, 2 = 2%, 3 = 6%, 4 =51%, 5 = 40%

“I like the school’s report cards/progress   report.” 3.69 (3.53)

“I like the school's   report card /progress report.” 4.06

1 = 0%, 2 = 11%, 3 = 17%, 4 = 28%, 5 = 45%

“The school’s assessment practices are fair.”   3.9 (3.81)

The school's   assessment practices are fair.” 4.35

1 = 0%, 2 = 2%, 3 = 4%, 4 = 50%, 5 = 43%

Staff Surveys

The mean responses to the nine highest scoring questions of the 2011 staff survey are reported in the left column (2009 responses are in parentheses). The 2014 question most similar to each 2011 question and its results are reported in the right column. The scale was adjusted to no longer include neutral as an option in 2014. Accordingly, mean scores in 2014 are expected to be lower. A mean of 4.0 in 2014 indicates 100% of respondents “strongly agree” while a mean of 4.0 in 2011 indicates that respondents “agree.”

2011 (24 total)

1 = strongly disagree

5 = strongly agree

2014 (27 total)

1 = strongly disagree

2= disagree

3=agree

4 = strongly agree

5= not applicable

“I feel that learning can be fun.” 4.71 (4.63)

No similar question.

“I love seeing the results of my work with   students.” 4.63 (4.67)

No similar question.

“I believe every student can learn.” 4.83 (4.8)

“I believe that every   student can learn.” 3.92

1 = 0%, 2 = 0%, 3 = 12%, 4 = 84%, 5 = 4%

“I believe student achievement can increase   through hands-on learning.” 4.71 (4.67)

No similar question.

“I believe student achievement can increase   through cooperative learning.” 4.54 (4.4)

No similar question.

“I believe student achievement can increase   through providing a threat-free environment.” 4.88 (4.86)

No similar question.

“I believe student achievement can increase through   close personal relationships between students and teachers.” 4.52 (4.6)

“I believe student   achievement can increase through close personal relationships between   students and

teachers.” 3.54

1 = 0%, 2 = 0%, 3 = 46%, 4 = 54%, 5 = 0%

“I believe student achievement can increase   through effective parent involvement.” 4.52 (4.73)

“I believe student   achievement can increase through effective parent involvement.” 3.77

1 = 0%, 2 = 0%, 3 = 23%, 4 = 77%, 5 = 0%

“I think it is important to communicate often   with parents.” 4.46 (4.53)

“I think it is   important to communicate often with parents.” 3.73

1 = 0%, 2 = 0%, 3 = 27%, 4 = 73%, 5 = 0%

The mean responses to the nine lowest scoring questions of the 2011 staff survey are reported in the left column (2009 responses are in parentheses). The 2014 question most similar to each 2011 question and its results are reported in the right column. The scale was adjusted to no longer include neutral as an option in 2014. Accordingly, mean scores in 2014 are expected to be lower. A mean of 4.0 in 2014 indicates 100% of respondents “strongly agree” while a mean of 4.0 in 2011 indicates that respondents “agree.” An increase of at least 10% in neutral positive responses (agree and strongly agree) is indicated by a green cell.

2011 (24 total)

1 = strongly disagree

2 = disagree

3 = neutral

4 = agree

5 = strongly agree

2014 (27 total)

1 = strongly disagree

2= disagree

3=agree

4 = strongly agree

5= not applicable

“I   feel recognized for good work.” 3.33 (3.75)

1 = 4%, 2 = 17%, 3 = 33%, 4 = 33%,  5 =   13%

“I feel recognized for   good work” 3.37

1 = 4%, 2 = 4%, 3 = 44%, 4 = 48%, 5 = 0%

“My   administrator is an effective instructional leader.” 2.79 (3.56)

1 = 25%, 2 = 17%, 3 = 25%, 4 = 21%, 5 = 13%

“My administrator is   an effective instructional leader.” 3.35

1 = 0%, 2 = 8%, 3 = 50%, 4 = 42%, 5 = 0%

“My   administrator facilitates communication effectively.” 2.83 (3.8)

1 = 21%, 2 = 25%, 3 = 13%, 4 = 33%, 5 = 8%

“My   administrator/supervisor facilitates communication effectively.” 3.15

1 = 4%, 2 = 12%, 3 = 50%, 4 = 35%, 5 = 0%

“My   administrator is effective in helping us reach our vision.” 3.04 (3.73)

1 = 17%, 2 = 13%, 3 = 29%, 4 = 33%, 5 = 8%

“My administrator is   effective in helping us reach our vision.” 3.38

1 = 4%, 2 = 4%, 3 = 42%, 4 = 50%, 5 = 0%

“The   vision of this school is clear.” 3.29 (4.13)

1 = 8%, 2 = 8%, 3 = 33%, 4 = 46%, 5 = 4%

“The vision of this   school is clear.” 3.54

1 = 0%, 2 = 0%, 3 = 50%, 4 = 46%, 5 = 4%

“Morale   is high on the part of teachers.” 2.13 (3.87)

1 = 42%, 2 = 17%, 3 = 33%, 4 = 4%, 5 = 4%

“Morale is high on the   part of teachers.” 3.31

1 = 0%, 2 = 4%, 3 = 65%, 4 = 27%, 5 = 4%

“Morale   is high on the part of support staff.” 3.13 (3.87)

1 = 4%, 2 = 21%, 3 = 42%, 4 = 25%, 5 = 8%

“Morale is high on the   part of support staff.” 3.04

1 = 4%, 2 = 12%, 3 = 62%, 4 = 23%, 5 = 0%

“Morale   is high on the part of administrators.” 3.04 (4)

1 = 8%, 2 = 13%, 3 = 50%, 4 = 25%, 5 = 4%

“Morale is high on the   part of administrators.” 3.23

1 = 4%, 2 = 0%, 3 = 69%, 4 = 23%, 5 = 4%

“I   use school performance data to set my professional development goals.” 3.25   (3.29)

1 = 4%, 2 = 13%, 3 = 50%, 4 = 21%, 5 = 13%

No similar question.

Some analysis questions Marissa and the CIP team still need to answer are:

  • What are the highest and lowest scoring items in the 2014 survey? How similar are the 2014 and 2011 lists of high- and low-scoring items?
  • What do the current results tell us about the effectiveness of our work to prevent and respond to bullying and harassment?
  • What information is missing?
  • What do the data suggest we should keep doing, stop doing, and change?
  1. Other Curricular Areas
  2. Science

As shared in June, Marissa has drafted a two year 1/2 science scope and sequence that is made up of two independent one-year cycles of Next Generation Science Standards for grades K-2. We will take a stab at the first and admittedly lighter cycle in 1/2 this year. We are excited that part of this science instruction will happen out in our woods and outdoor classroom with the help of a North Branch Nature Center staff member as we pilot their Educating Children Outdoors (ECO) program. Our participation in the program was announced in our back to school mailing. For context, here is that announcement:

A final change I am pleased to announce is the piloting of a program through the North Branch Nature Center called Educating Children Outdoors (ECO). Our first and second graders will participate in an outdoor lesson one afternoon every other week. In this program, ECO program coordinators have shared that students explore standards-based themes that include (depending on the grade level): animal adaptations, life cycles, ecosystems, rocks and soil, scientific method, physical geography, mapping, cultural diversity, Vermont history (including native Vermonters), Vermont geography, and citizenship.  This content will be presented through skill-based games, observing, journaling, building, drawing, writing, tracking, and sharing stories. We are looking forward to piloting this program with our 1/2 students and are particularly excited about the opportunity to work closely with NBNC staff to integrate these lessons with our classroom goals and instruction. First and second grade parents will receive a letter in the first weeks of school with more information about the program and related volunteer opportunities. Hands on Nature for first and second grade students will be integrated into ECO sessions while the regular schedule of one monthly lesson will continue in kindergarten and grades three through six.

  1. Spanish

After three separate postings and rounds of interviews, we have been unable to find a qualified Spanish teacher. The primary challenge has been finding a candidate with a license or who is eligible for a provisional license. The position, a full time teaching job to be shared by Calais, Berlin, and Doty, has just been re-posted. Additionally, Bill is working with the Agency of Education on issues of licensure for otherwise viable candidates. We remain committed to finding a Spanish teacher and continuing this program.

  1. Other
  2. Summer Projects

Below is a list of projects completed this summer. In a few cases, the work is not yet finished, but materials have been purchased and work is projected to be finished by mid-September. More details, including actual costs, will be shared in September.

  •   Roof Sections #2-#5
  •   Floor Finishing
  •   Pre-School Walkway
  •   General Building Repairs
  •   Exterior Painting
  •   Playground Repairs
  •   Driveway Gravel
  •   Sewage Ejector
  •   Interior Painting
  •   Network Updates and Improvements
  •   Carpet Cleaning
  •   New Dome for Upper Playground
  1. Student Attendance Data and Requirements

Below is a table reporting attendance data for students in grades K-6 for the 2013-2014 school year.

26+ Absences

16-25 Absences

10 -15 Absences

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

9

8.0%

2

1.8%

15

13.3%

5-9 Absences

0-4 Absences

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

43

38.1%

44

38.9%

State statute requires that all children aged 6-18 attend an approved education program full time. It further directs counties to develop and follow protocols to monitor and respond to truancy. In Washington County, protocol dictates that schools take action when a student has missed 5 days of school and then again at both 10 and 15 total absences. The protocol sets 15 absences as the maximum number that should be expected due to illness and family commitments.

Calais students, staff, and families should take pride in the fact that 90.3% of students had strong attendance in the 2013-2014 school year, missing 15 or fewer days of school. At the same time, it is concerning that nearly one in ten students missed more than the maximum allowed by Washington County protocol. Further, it is worrying to note that seven students missed between 33 and 55 days of school. These students missed 18% to 31% of the school year. For your information, a flowchart showing the Washington County truancy protocol has been included in the board packet.

  1. Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)

If you’ve been reading the newspaper, you have probably seen that, under No Child Left Behind, 100% of students were expected to be proficient in reading and math by 2014. Unsurprisingly, no Vermont school met this target last year. Other states have applied for and been granted waivers from No Child Left Behind. Vermont has chosen not to pursue a waiver in large part due to qualms with the requirements for teacher evaluation systems set forth by the waiver process.

The circumstances described above mean that CES did not demonstrate adequate yearly progress last year. As this is our first year not meeting AYP, the consequences are minimal. While we are identified as low performing, we have no formal school improvement status at this time. For your information, the memo written to parents and caregivers by Secretary Rebecca Holcombe has been included in this packet. Marissa and Bill will keep the board apprised of developments in this arena both in general and as they relate specifically to CES.

  1. 2014-2015 Enrollment

We are currently expected 136 students in grades PreK-6 for the upcoming school year. This includes eight new students in grades K-6.

 

Principal's Report June 2014

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Principal and Superintendent’s Report – June 23, 2014

  1. Literacy

The reading scores are in! This year, 89% of students in grades K-6 have ended the year at or above grade level as measured by the Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment. Many of those meeting grade level standards are on IEPs, 504 plans, or EST plans and have received intervention from our reading specialist and/or special educators. The hard work of our students and teachers has certainly paid great dividends!

June is Continuous Improvement Plan month at the board level. The staff voted to adopt the CIP as written at our meeting on June 6, 2014. The CIP is enclosed in the packet.

Here is the summary of the work the CIP outlines in literacy for the 2014-2015 school year:

Goal #1: Literacy

Literacy work at CES   and in WCSU has focused on writing for the past two years. This   emphasis will continue as we work to implement WCSU student achievement   non-negotiables for writing and refine our All School Writing Prompt system   in the 2014-2015. We will also work as a staff to create a K-6 scope and   sequence of writing conventions skills and accompanying formative assessment   protocol and tracking tool. We aim to lead 80% of students to mastery of   grade level writing skills as measured by the year-end summative All School   Prompts that will be administered in May 2015.

In reading, we   aim to maintain our strong results on the Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark   Assessment. We also plan to lead our low-income students to greater success   in writing: our goal is to reduce the proficiency gap between students who   receive free- and reduced-price lunch and those who do not to 10% or less on   the F&P.

In all content   areas, we plan to begin analyzing local assessment data for trends in   achievement related to special education status, family income, and gender.   This is particularly important in the coming years as we shift to a new state   assessment and therefore lose our primary source of data that is readily   analyzed in this manner. Also in all content areas, we will work to create a   Google site that documents our instruction, assessment, and intervention   practices by articulating how these can be understood as a Multi-Tiered   System of Supports (MTSS). Finally, we will form a committee to investigate   possible structures to support a 30-minute intervention/extension period that   would allow for a true “double dip” for students who are struggling.

While it didn’t make the one page summary of the CIP, it is important to note that the literacy section of the CIP includes action steps to ensure we are teaching the technology skills students will need to have in order to be successful on and feel positive about the new SBAC assessments. This is a purposely small and basic step; in the coming years we hope to also standardize practice to include using technology to enrich and deepen learning throughout the school day and year.

Three teachers are taking workshops in teaching reading and/or writing this summer. Stacey Potter, Marcy Larrabee, and Mary Carpenter are looking forward to opportunities to
“continuously improve” their literacy instruction. As a staff, we are excited for the new ideas they will bring back, especially those ideas that can help us further develop our assessment and instruction in writing.

  1. Mathematics

The staff will discuss the executive summary of the Comprehensive and Collaborative Mathematics Review during June in-service time. The CES Math Committee will lead this conversation. We are happy to note that the WCSU Mathematics Steering Committee and the CES staff had already identified many of the next steps listed as recommendations in the review.

Here is the summary of the work the CIP outlines in mathematics for the 2014-2015 school year:

Goal #2: Math


  In mathematics, our work will focus using data   from a quarterly benchmark assessment system, continuing to teach and assess   the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice, and implementing WCSU   student achievement non-negotiables. We will also develop number sense and   fact fluency assessments and tracking tools to monitor foundational skills   K-6. A final area of work in math will be developing forms and procedures   that standardize Tier 2 intervention data collection and documentation. In   all phases, we will keep track of work at the WCSU level and work to be sure   our efforts set us up for successful implementation of work from the Math   Steering Committee.

Three teachers and one CES student will participate in this summer’s math lab school taught by Mahesh Sharma. Randilee Raynor, Lisa Levangie, and Ted Nathanson are looking forward to working and learning together in July.

  1. School Climate

School Climate survey data has been compiled. Special events and year-end deadlines, however, have forced Marissa to table careful analysis until the summer.

We had our final PBIS All School Celebration on Friday, June 13th. Students chose between quiet reading under the parachute in the music room, a movie in the library, and active games in the gym. Somewhere around half the kids chose to hang out in the gym – surprisingly, two hours of dodge ball with 40-50 kids on Friday the 13th is a recipe for success! A great, multiage, and safe time was had by all!

  1. Other Curricular Areas
  2. Science

Mary Carpenter will be taking a follow-up NGSS course this summer. In this course, she will design a unit of NGSS-aligned instruction for her third graders to be taught in the 2014-2015 school year. Marissa met with the 1/2 teachers recently and a plan was made to have Marissa work at creating two independent year-long NGSS sequences that would allow for a two-year science cycle for the multiage classes. We are looking forward to beginning the process of shifting to NGSS.

  1. Other
  2. Open Meeting Law

Here is the link for the statute detailing the new rules for open meetings: http://www.leg.state.vt.us/docs/2014/bills/Passed/H-497C.pdf

  1. Summer Projects

Below is an updated list of projects for the summer of 2014. In some cases, prices have changed dramatically. We have also added the purchase of a new piece of playground equipment as the upper playground dome has proven un-repairable.

Project

Cost

Capital Project?

Roof Sections #2-#5

$114,250.00

Yes

Heating System compressor

$2,500.00

Yes

Pre-School Walkway

$3,500.00

Yes

Exterior Painting

$500.00

Yes

Exterior Doors

$2,000.00

Yes

Driveway Gravel

$1,000.00

Yes

Interior Painting

Labor

Yes

Carpet Cleaning

Labor

Yes

Floor Finishing

Labor

Yes

General Building Repairs

Labor

Yes

Extra Part Time Custodian Hours

$314.20

Yes

Playground Repairs

$1,000.00

Yes

Sewage Ejector

$4,000.00

Yes

PA System Install (linked to phones)

$4,500.00

Yes

Network Updates and Improvements

$5,000.00

Yes

Phone System Updates

$5,000.00

Yes

New Window Coverings

$433.05

Yes

New Dome for Upper Playground

$3,000.00

Yes

iPad Cart (20 student/2 adult)

$13,300.00

No

Total Cost of   "Have To" Projects

$133,564.20

Total Cost of Capital   Projects

$146,997.25

Total Cost of Projects

$160,297.25

Capital Balance as of   July 1, 2014*

$172,239.00

*for simplicity, these   calculations assume all roof expenses occur after July 1

Capital Balance Less   "Have To" Projects

$25,241.75

Capital Balance Less   all Capital Projects

$11,941.75

"Extra" Fund   Balance as of July 1, 2014**

$70,771.00

**extra fund balance =   amount over 5%

  1. Capital Plan

Per the information request submitted at the May 27th board meeting, the full capital plan Excel file from Jason Rowell has been included with the email to which this packet was attached.  If you find the format confusing, we will bring samples of other capital plans from schools within the supervisory union that you may find easier to understand.  Based on the input you provide at the meeting, we will provide a more thorough capital plan in August.

 


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